The Welsh Embassador – Act Three, Scene Two

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Flourish; enter KING, CORNWALL and CHESTER.

KING
This is the day of audience.  Fetch him in
With an addition of such regal state
As may inflame the Welsh men not to bow
Their knees for fear, but love, and not repine
To pay us tribute.  Nations even most rude
Stroke’d gently feel no weight of servitude.
What is he?

CORNWALL
Troth, sir, a goodly gentleman;
Take that rough bark away his country gives him—
Yet grows he straight and smooth—yourself would swear
Natu<r>e had spend some curiosity
<When> she made him, for with a cunning hand
<Valour> and love in’s face, strive for command.

KING
‘Tis fitter for the mould in which we’ll cast him,
Cornwall, for that great work, which in your care
I builded lately.

CORNWALL
Touching Armante.

KING
That.

CORNWALL
The wheels must have no palsy hands to guide ’em.

KING
An engineer’s, the sinewy Voltimar’s.
Mankind shows not his equal.

CORNWALL
Is he trusty?

KING
As the tir’d Atlas that upshoulders heaven.
Bring in that rarity of nations,
Our Welsh Embassador.  How now, Voltimar?                                [Exit CHESTER.

Enter VOLTIMAR.

What speaks the almanac in Armante’s eyes?

VOLTIMAR
Great winds, blust’ring awhile, but—

KING
Out with it, man, aloud.  The noble Cornwall
Is in our plot a partner.

VOLTIMAR
Why then, sir, I ha’ so plied the lady with warm persuasions.  She’s supple; if your bold Briton dares plant his ram of battery, she’ll abide the assault.

KING
My excellent soldier,
We must use art to arm him, and take time.

VOLTIMAR
That great grumbling organ pipe likewise of mutiny, the lords of her faction, by a trick that I turn’d ‘em with, are all musical and come to court, to honour your entertainment of the strangers with their presences.

CORNWALL
Rather to spy.

KING
No matter.  We’ll have eyes
As piercing as their own.  Be quiet, they come.

Hoboys.  Enter WINCHESTER, COLCHESTER, CESTER, KENT, then PENDA the Welsh Embassador brave; ELDRED as a Welsh Servingman; WINCHESTER and his faction kiss the KING’s hand, and then place themselves for audience.

PENDA
Awl the showers above us, power down upon your mighty heads.

VOLTIMAR
[Aside.] We shall be sure to have rain enough then.

PENDA
Her benedictions and remunerations, and exultations of all monarchal dignities.

VOLTIMAR
[Aside.] There’s no harm in this.

PENDA
In Wales, oh magnanimous King Athelstanes, we have no universities to tawg in uplandish Greeks and Latins; we are not so full of our rhetorics as you have here, and therefore your great and masestical ears was not to look for filed oratories and pig high stiles.

KING
We do not.

PENDA
You are landlord of Wales, my master a prince of royal Prittish plod your tenants; he and awl the sentilmen of Wales send commendations to you awl and swear with true Welse hearts, and long Welse hook, to fide upon your side when they can stand, till our bardles play on twinkling harps the praveries of your victories.

KING
We are beholding to them.  Is not the day
Of paying their tribute yearly now at hand?

OMNES
It is, sir.

PENDA
And was come to give significations to king Athelstan’s that awl our tributes is here py and py upon ten day’s hence to come.

ELDRED
‘Twill be awl here upom Lammas Day was senight.

VOLTIMAR
[Aside.] Later Lammas, ha, ha!

PENDA
Why is your teehees and weehees?  Is hobby-horse here or shacknapes, or loggerhead elephant with flapping poptail snowtes?

CORNWALL
Grow not, my lord, to cholar.

PENDA
Collars?  Had I the petter of us awl in Powis land to fleer and seer and sneer in our faces was a good to eat a Welse goat, hairs and horns, and puddings and awl in her pelly piping hot.

KING
Who is it that dares jeer?

ELDRED
Pray, tell her who it is, shall find, diggon, from Welse hook to a prick no longer as this of a putchers when any tares sallenge my lord or Reese his man upon duellos and combats and batallios and pells mells.  Welse plod is up and can canog and roar.

COLCHESTER
Is that your man, my lord?

PENDA
Yes, and a sentil man of an old as any Wales.

KENT
He’s very furious.

ELDRED
Furies, a true Welse man scorns redicles and laughins.

PENDA
And is mighty sellous of grinnings, and is loose her best plod in <   > wounds sooner as loose an inse, inse, nay a crum<b>’s we<ight  > in the scales of honour.

KING
I fain would know who u<s’d> him <thus   >.

VOLTIMAR
I laughed, but not at him, royal sir.

PENDA
You logh; would us two both now were on the bald pate of Penmawer!

VOLTIMAR
Would we were.

ELDRED
Should try who was finest tumbler down, on’s neck must cry twang for’t.

PENDA
Good Reese, be wise.

KENT
What your follower’s name?

ELDRED
‘Tis Reese ap Meridith, ap Sean, ap Llewellin, ap Morris, yet no dancers.  For awl you are English lords, you are made of no petter whole than a Welseman, a little finer spun and petter carded that’s awl.  Our plod is as well-died, and our spirits as good a nap upon her.

KING
‘Tis so, we like your spirits and have tried them.

PENDA
Your kinglines had two fine sentilmen your brothers, one Prince Edmonds and Prince Edreds; they did kanaw our Prittish spirits; they fought in Wales very finely upon us.  Reese, you saw them all ploody adbout Clanvelthin.

ELDRED
Yes, and after the drink metheglin diggon.

PENDA
And was mighty merry.

ELDRED
And love to gabble a little Welse too.

PENDA
Pray, sir, what treads of life does they two sentlemen spin now?

KING
None.  They both died i’th’field.

PENDA
Mercy upon us!  In fields as beggars do?

VOLTIMAR
No, maser comrogue, in a battle.

KING
In a French noble field those princes fell.

PENDA
Was prave men.  Pogs on knog’d ‘em down.

KING
Though they are lost, here sits a brother king
To bid you welcome.  Call our English court
Your own, England your Wales.  We are so strung
We will in nothing differ but in tongue.

PENDA
Welse tongue I can tell you is lofty tongue.

ELDRED
And prave sentlemen as are in the ‘orld tawg it

KING
Show to this noble lord what rarities
Our court is furnish’d with.

PENDA
Follow, Reese.

ELDRED
Not as moust in seese, I warrant her.

[Flourish.  Exeunt PENDA, ELDRED, and VOLTIMAR.

KING
Whilst I bestow
My second thanks upon these worthy ords
By whom our court—a heaven eclipsed before—
Recovers a new light.

COLCHESTER
What light we give is borrow’d from your sunbeams.

KING
I am proud to see your brows so smooth.

OMNES
Our brows are as our hearts.

Enter VOLTIMAR and EDMOND like an Irishman.

 VOLTIMAR
Look, sirrah, that’s the king.

KING
What’s he?

VOLTIMAR
The embassador’s Irish footman full of desire to see how much you and an Irish king differ in state.  Which of the Irish kings know you, sirrah?

EDMOND
I once serve and run along my Morogh man Breean, king of Lienster, and I know all de oder Irish princes.

KING
How does the king of Lienster?

EDMOND
I’faitla, passing merry.  He loves dee dearly.  Dærdæry his queen too speak well of dee, and Osha hanassah de king’s broder wid Dermot Lave-yarach tell me and I come into England to give dee a towsand comendacons.

KING
What’s the name?

EDMOND
Teage mac Breean.

KING
How far canst run in a day?

EDMOND
I’faitla, I shall be loat to have dine own horse run so far in a day as I can.  Ever since I came away from de salt water into Wales and out of Wales hidder, my toes and my feet nefer stawnd still, for bee my gossip’s hawnd I had a great desire to see dee, and dat sweet face a dine.

KING
The kind of Lienster is a noble soldier.

EDMOND
Crees sa me, he does not care for de devil.

VOLTIMAR
Wiser man he.

KING
The queen is wondrous fair, sirrah, is she not?

EDMOND
Queen Dærdæry i’faith now as white as de inside of a pome water, and as upright as any dart in Ireland.

COLCHESTER
Goes your kind in such clothes?

EDMOND
<In> trooses a pox a die face, I priddy what should h<e go i>n besides?

[Exeunt KING, CORNWALL, CHESTER, VOLTIMAR, and EDMOND.

 <WINCHESTER>
<V>oltim<ar.>

COLCHESTER
So th’ice is thaw’d and though the water run
Smooth, yet ‘tis deep.  Our torrent must roar on.

OMNES
On.                                                                                                                             [Exeunt.

Proceed to the next scene

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