The Roaring Girl – Dramatis Personæ

Return to Introduction

SIR ALEXANDER WENGRAVE,
NEATFOOT, his man.
SIR ADAM APPLETON .
SIR DAVY DAPPER. SIR BEAUTEOUS GANYMEDE.
SIR THOMAS LONG.
LORD NOLAND.
Young SEBASTIAN WENGRAVE.
JACK DAPPER, son to Sir Davy.
GULL his page.
GOSHAWK .
GREENWIT .
LAXTON .
TILTYARD, a feather-seller.
MISTRESS TILTYARD.
OPENWORK, a sempster.
MISTRESS ROSEAMOND OPENWORK.
HIPPOCRATES GALLIPOT, an apothecary.
MISTRESS PRUDENCE GALLIPOT.
MOLL, the Roaring Girl.
RALPH TRAPDOOR.
TEARCAT.
SIR GUY FITZALLARD.
MARY FITZALLARD, his daughter.
CURTILAX, a sergeant.
HANGER, his yeoman.
Ministri.
Coachman.
Porter.
Tailor.
Gentlemen.
Cutpurses.
Fellow.

—–

To the Comic Play-Readers, Venery and Laughter

The fashion of play-making I can properly compare to nothing so naturally as the alteration in apparel: for in the time of the great crop-doublet, your huge bombasted plays, quilted with mighty words to lean purposes, was only then in fashion. And as the doublet fell, neater inventions began to set up. Now in the time of spruceness, our plays follow the niceness of our garments: single plots, quaint conceits, lecherous jests, dressed up in hanging sleeves, and those are fit for the times and the termers. Such a kind of light-colour summer stuff, mingled with diverse colours, you shall find this published comedy, good to keep you in an afternoon from dice, at home in your chambers; and for venery you shall find enough for sixpence, but well couched and you mark it, for Venus being a woman passes through the play in doublet in breeches, a brave disguise and a safe one if the statute untie not her codpiece point. The book I make no question but is fit for many of your companies, as well as the person itself, and may be allowed both galley room at the playhouse, and chamber room at your lodging. Worse things I must needs confess the world has taxed her for than has been written of her; but ’tis the excellency of a writer to leave things better than he finds ’em; though some obscene fellow (that cares not what he writes against others, yet keeps a mystical bawdy-house himself, and entertains drunkards to make use of their pockets and vent his private bottle-ale at midnight), though such a one would have ripped up the most nasty vice that ever hell belched forth and presented it to a modest assembly, yet we rather wish in such discoveries, where reputation lies bleeding, a slackness of truth than a fullness of slander.

Thomas Middleton

Proceed to Prologue

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